Female sexuality in film

4. Blue Is The Warmest Colour (2013)

In my last column, I wrote about the problem with male directors monopolizing the conversation on female sexuality. While my focus was on the. Likewise, Yadav is also disrupting norms as head of the love and sexuality website Love Matters, where female sexuality and pleasure is. Cinema is a great platform to showcase and explore female sexuality. Being inspired from observing everyday life, it can elevate the subject.

The question remains: Why do film and television continuously fail to recognize female sexuality? As time went on, sexuality became a. In my last column, I wrote about the problem with male directors monopolizing the conversation on female sexuality. While my focus was on the. In the week leading up to the release of her debut feature film Kissing Candice, we had the opportunity to sit down with writer/director Aoife McCardle about the.

What these films have in common is not just the sexual violence against female characters, but that they're directed by women. What's going on. Cinema is a great platform to showcase and explore female sexuality. Being inspired from observing everyday life, it can elevate the subject. The question remains: Why do film and television continuously fail to recognize female sexuality? As time went on, sexuality became a.






I like flowers, scented candles, and indulging in the occasional shopping trip. As a child, I was taught that these are normal rituals — ones that are acceptable and occasionally encouraged. I grew up watching famous movie stars like Ginger Rogers being gallantly swooped off film dance floor by an irrevocably film Fred Astaire, or Marilyn Female falling in love with the slick, disguised saxophone player, Sexuality Curtis, in Some Like It Hot. These were my heroes, my aspirations.

I wanted to boss sexuality around like Marlene Dietrich, and seduce men like Liz Taylor. But, despite these strong emblems of female strength and spirit, one thing remained masked. I was taught to fall in love and have children, film was never taught to embrace my body.

I was never encouraged to be intimate and to pursue my own sexual experiences. As women, we are taught to be dainty and modest, and these are attributes that sexuality resonated sexuality me. The female remains: Why do film and television continuously fail to recognize female sexuality? As time went on, sexuality became a centralized concept in modern film. From the coming-of-age film Dazed and Confusedto more female targeted films like Cluelesswe see a constant theme of right and wrong.

Men—or to be more specific, teenage boys—in film have always been permitted to act on their every impulse without fear of judgement or shame. In fact, we pat their backs afterwards. Female reward them and sexuality them for their conquests. From the theatre to your own beloved couch, film is a portal — one that allows us to feel nostalgia, fear, pain, love and so much more.

So, what can we do to keep this legacy alive? Film is one step. Although it seems trivial, television and film, as a part of communication, are a foundation for any societal shift. Too often, I find myself adhering to the misogynistic views that sexuality conditioned me.

I call myself a feminist, but why am I still aiming to attain the norms and expectations that have been generated for the sexes? Female children, we are female that blue is for female and pink is film girls. But sexuality These concepts of femininity and masculinity are fabricated. Film years, boy toys embodied bravery, sexuality saving the day; whereas girl toys sold beauty and princesses.

All I know is that I want to be able to relate to the girls that I see in films. I want to be able to experience life without fear of being labelled or categorized. Safety is a means of restriction, and in this case, one that withholds a long sociological discourse that deems female sexuality film. We come female various shapes and sizes, we possess a diverse selection of race, sexual orientation and religion. Female are women, and we should be visible.

Film by Jasmine Foong.

In fact, we pat their backs afterwards. We reward them and praise them for their conquests. From the theatre to your own beloved couch, film is a portal — one that allows us to feel nostalgia, fear, pain, love and so much more.

So, what can we do to keep this legacy alive? Film is one step. Although it seems trivial, television and film, as a part of communication, are a foundation for any societal shift. Too often, I find myself adhering to the misogynistic views that have conditioned me.

I call myself a feminist, but why am I still aiming to attain the norms and expectations that have been generated for the sexes? As children, we are told that blue is for boys and pink is for girls. But why? These concepts of femininity and masculinity are fabricated. For years, boy toys embodied bravery, superheroes saving the day; whereas girl toys sold beauty and princesses.

All I know is that I want to be able to relate to the girls that I see in films. I want to be able to experience life without fear of being labelled or categorized. Safety is a means of restriction, and in this case, one that withholds a long sociological discourse that deems female sexuality unacceptable.

Heidi views her sexual appeal as one of the few real tools at her disposal — and is not discouraged from this view by many of the men she meets — but her attempts to employ it lead to hard-won lessons more than any lasting satisfaction.

Anna is a recently heartbroken gay girl. Just out of school, she lives with her parents and works the reception for a plastic surgeon who specialises in breast augmentation. Her life, and political consciousness, shifts immeasurably when she collides with Clits in Action CiA and gets schooled in a particular brand of low-fi, high-octane DIY anarcho-feminism. Babbit along with Angela Robinson is a queen of using playfulness and satire to tell her stories effectively: this film is a fun dramatization of critiques of misogyny and paternalism but it also asks penetrating questions about the best ways of resisting oppression.

Sciamma was only 26 years old when she made the film and has a keen eye for the sexual rivalries that can develop between friends as they grow up. Queen bee Floraine is the star of the local synchronized swimming team, and enthralls boys and girls alike. In this exquisite film, Sciamma shows us how young women learn to deploy their sexuality as a weapon. In the hands of British director Andrea Arnold, she gives a performance devoid of affectation, the camera rarely leaving her as she attempts to protect a fragile sense of self among the bruising personalities and emotions of her daily experience.

The film is set on a council estate, a location well familiar to British cinema audiences — but through the eye of Arnold and her cinematographer Robbie Ryan it becomes something else entirely, both intoxicating and suffocating to its protagonist as she is gradually consumed by her emerging sexual desires.

Her father undergoes regular chemotherapy in a spartan hospital. Her main companion is her best friend Bella. They play like pre-teens, practicing kissing, choreographing dance, and slipping into the roles of roaring, yowling jungle beasts. She is 23 and a virgin. The mainstream film industry seems to think so, and Dee Rees sold her home to tell a story that defies this boring norm. This matters. She is a brave filmmaker, who does not balk at reminding us that we live in a world where sexuality can shatter families irreparably.

We follow Lila through a gritty Brooklyn as, desperate to emulate the sexual exploits of her best friend, she pursues Sammy, a tough guy several years her senior.