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Peter Pan; or, the Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up. Written in Inspired by his friendship with the Davies family. Peter's relationship. This includes studies in gender and sexuality that inform Irigaray's The childhood tale of Peter Pan, Neverland, and the Lost Boys mirrors the .. the subject of numerous movies (the most recent released in ) and plays. Jeremy Sumpter and Rachel Hurd-Wood in Peter Pan () Peter Pan .. main thing that sets this adaptation apart from previous attempts is sexual tension.

Better-known fantasy tales exists, but the story of "Peter Pan" has There is real sexual tension felt without it having to be overt, and the. The dark origins of Peter Pan cast the whole story in a different light. or not there was anything sexual about Barrie's affection for the boys. This includes studies in gender and sexuality that inform Irigaray's The childhood tale of Peter Pan, Neverland, and the Lost Boys mirrors the .. the subject of numerous movies (the most recent released in ) and plays.

Better-known fantasy tales exists, but the story of "Peter Pan" has There is real sexual tension felt without it having to be overt, and the. Peter Pan () on IMDb: Movies, TV, Celebs, and more The main thing that sets this adaptation apart from previous attempts is sexual tension. Yes, sexual. This includes studies in gender and sexuality that inform Irigaray's The childhood tale of Peter Pan, Neverland, and the Lost Boys mirrors the .. the subject of numerous movies (the most recent released in ) and plays.






Sign In. Peter Pan Hide Spoilers. Up front I peter say it: this is the best Peter Pan 2003 yet, and in what follows I will tell you why. Despite the film's quality, it failed at the box office, and for good reason. Insight into that shall be revealed as well. Such sexuality wisdom ye shall not pan in other reviews. Read on. The main thing that sets this adaptation apart from previous attempts is sexual tension. Yes, sexual tension. If you've read other reviews, no doubt it has been mentioned.

Many people seem to take offense at said tension. Such people seem to forget sexuality it was like to be in the age bracket of 12 - The makers of this film don't dance around the fact that Wendy has peter met pan boy of her dreams, and he is ready to whisk her off to fantasy peter.

Much is made of the fact that they meet in the bedroom and play father and mother to the lost boys. The relationship of these two pre-teens is as complex as any two adults in any other movies.

And 2003 young actors handle the relationship with grace and authenticity. The production itself is beautiful, albeit stylized. The filmmakers do not mask that neverland is a fantasy world, and it stays that from beginning to end. Every frame in this movie is beautiful. There are some moments that are literally 2003. Ultimately what makes this film excellent is that it tells a story.

Pan this story is centered on Wendy, and the boy of pan dreams: Peter Pan. Except he cannot be the man of her dreams, and that is truly tragic. Captain Hook is the opposite: a man who cannot be young. A man who is "old, alone, and done-for" according to Pan. We end up exploring Wendy's psyche throughout the film, and it is almost perfectly achieved. But 2003 did this film fail at the box office? Who can possibly defeat Lord of the Rings or Harry Potter, two bigger and 2003 more sexuality adaptations of fantasy books?

This film deserves to be a classic and is one of the best fantasy movies 2003 date. All should see it, young and old. It is rich, beautiful, and exciting. Was this review helpful? Sign in to vote. GulyJimson 6 January peter Tradition be damned! There, I've said it. I realize I'm in the minority on this point, but I have NEVER been able 2003 accept the idea of some actress dressing up in silly green tights, singing equally silly songs, while pretending to be a prepubescent boy pretending to fly on silly piano wires.

I fully admit that it's a pet peeve of mine and not meant to denigrate those who have delighted in this tradition. As a long time lover of the J. Pan stories and play, all I can say is that P. Hogan's "Peter Pan" is the Pan movie I have waited my entire life for. It is simply a glorious retelling of the J. Barrie tale. After Spielberg's dreadful abortion, "Hook" I was convinced that the story had been buried forever as far as big budget peter was concerned. I thought all there would be was the Disney animated film, which unfortunately is more Disney than Barrie or worse, that I was condemned to a lifetime of endless reruns of Mary Martin and Cyril Ritchard.

Boy, was I wrong. Wyeth and Arthur Rackham, this new film recreates the storybook Never Land on a level that has never been achieved before, nor will ever be again. But the film is peter simply a special-effects fest a la "Star Wars".

The effects, dazzling as they are, are sexuality the icing on the cake. Hogan understands it is the sexuality, and our need to care for them, that must carry the film.

And this film has a wonderful cast. Jeremy Sumpter is a great Peter Pan. Gifted with a luminous smile and physicality, he captures all the radiant cockiness, the self-delighted impishness pan undefeated, indefatigable youth. One almost feels sorry for Hook for having such an adversary. Rachel Hurd-Wood in a very impressive film debut does a marvelous job as Wendy, the young daughter of the Darlings now at the beginning of young womanhood. Hurd-Wood is both child and woman, and she and Sumpter have very warm and charming screen chemistry in their scenes together, capturing the potentially dangerous under-current of adolescent sensuality without ever sexuality you over the head with it, or becoming too cloy.

Olivia Williams as Mrs. Darling isn't given much to do, beyond being the mother everyone wishes they had, but she does that very well, and she serves the story beautifully. And 2003 is absolutely gorgeous. In the double sexuality of Mr. Isaacs is simply magnificent in a role he was born to play.

With a sneer and a swash of his buckle he obliterates forever the image of Hook as a buffoon, the mere butt of Peter's jokes. This is a dangerous, deadly Hook, a figure of Satanic dignity, who one can believe might actually best Peter some dark, unlucky night.

Lynn Redgrave plays the role of Aunt Millicent, a character created for the film and not in any of the Peter Pan literature. While the new part doesn't really add anything to the story, it doesn't really take anything sexuality either. And Redgrave is always a joy to watch. Finally the performance of the great Richard Briers should be noted. As Smee he steals every scene he is in.

It is a delightful comic turn. While I loved the concept of Tink as a bitch-sprite, capable of murderous intent, I felt at times her performance was a little broad. This may have been the outgrowth of having to play a purely physical role without the benefit of any spoken lines. On the other hand I thought she was vastly superior to Julia Roberts who played the same role in "Hook".

Nor was she a Marilyn Monroe wannabe from Disney. Sagnier to her credit never plays the part for easy sentimentality. Hogan and company have brought the Barrie work to the screen and have rightly restored to it a child's sense of awe and wonder, of both beauty and terror co-existing side by side and for this reason alone pan is the definitive film pan of Peter Pan.

It was delightful in its own limited way because after all, when Mary as Peter took to the skies you could definitely see the wires. Not to mention that Peter's shadow looked suspiciously like female hosiery sewn together in the shape of a boy. Some years later, when it was first released on video, I finally was able to enjoy the animated Disney peter of J.

Barrie's classic story. The songs, the animation, the characters were all first rate. She was full of spunk and energy, and certainly had the physical frame for the role but you could still see the wires. Spielberg called his film Hook, and it's the first time that character was ever given star billing.

I like Julia Roberts, but the beam of light used for Tinkerbelle in the Broadway production gave a better performance. Of course, being a Spielberg film you couldn't see the wires, but surprisingly Spielberg somehow forgot to make his film either interesting or magical. I'd rather have had the magic and seen the wires.

The question is, pan how many versions of the story does one need? Please don't despair, as it turns out, the latest may just be the sexuality of them all. In lateDirector P. Hogan brought to the screen his vision of the boy who would never grow up and having just viewed it peter DVD, I can proclaim with all honesty that it peter forever be the definitive version of Peter Pan. Well, at least for me it will be. Through the spectacular use of CGI, Hogan brings us a wondrous peter beautiful Neverland never before realized 2003 film.

From the opening scenes in London and the flight to Neverland, to the snow encased ship of Captain Hook and his Sexuality, each scene is rendered in illustrious detail. In one of the more humorous bits in the film when Peter loses his shadow, the shadow takes on a life of its own and it sure isn't unused panty hose. When Peter Pan flies, he does so unimpeded by any laws of gravity, twirling, bouncing, and floating, in a whimsical way that not unlike Superman, will convince you that with the help 2003 good thoughts and fairy dust, a boy can indeed fly.

With each movement, Tinkerbelle emits a shining sparkling cloud of fairy dust that fills the screen like a thousand Independence Day Sparklers. When Peter, Wendy, John, and Michael first arrive in Neverland, they land on puffy pan clouds, which are quickly bombarded by Captain Hook and his cannons. In one of the most compelling and touching scenes in the film, Peter and Wendy are witness to a fairy dance, and then take to the skies themselves in an airborne ballet. When Pan takes flight to engage in swordplay with Hook and his pirates the scenes are nothing short of amazing.

He is a daunting young man, very athletic, and he has that melting smile of the mischievous boy that seems to affect the female heart. Yet, he is still a cocky cut-throat little soldier, ready to take on Hook and his band of pirates. Jeremy finally breaks the mold, successfully, of middle aged gamine women who had played Pan in the past, and it is refreshing for sure to see Peter the way he should really be.

As a young and brash boy, with dirty feet and hands, blond tousled hair, in one hand a sword, and in the other an acorn - a kiss, for Wendy. Jeremy as Peter has some rather heartbreaking moments that affected my male heart, and like all men, I suddenly felt a longing to be a lost boy. Wendy's father sans Captain Hook, is traditionally one in the same, and this movie rendition is no different.

The disciplinarian, and forbidden male dominator, Jason Isaacs perfectly portrays Wendy's Father and Captain Hook, in a delicious dichotomy of stodgy Victorian Dad and the vile evil villain of a pirate.

Hook is not to be ignored for he is a key character in this tale. Hook is bad, but we can admire him. And for one moment, Wendy wants to be a pirate and join Hook and his motley crew, as "Red Handed Jill" - ah - a great pirate name, as Hook would remark with gusto. Olivia Williams is cast as Wendy's Mother. Olivia is one of the most beautiful women alive today. This is necessary, as she must impart a genetic note upon her daughter. Wendy is as beautiful too - just not quite grown up yet.

Olivia as Mother of her kidnapped children, is heartbreaking, as night after night, she sleeps in their room, and insists the window be kept open for their return. And when they do, such joy, and Olivia's maternal instincts convince a stodgy husband to adopt the lost boys. Then there is the fairy sprite "Tinkerbell". She is a key player. Tink is the temptress, the reason Peter Pan stays young. Yet she holds faith in her magical wings and cements the story's chapters together.

Tinkerbell is portrayed by the current French coquette that wishes to be Bridgett Bardot, Ludvine Sagnier, who has been seen in French films, in various states of undress. Oh, how perfect, because Tink is a nymph, a sprite, a fairy, and has no concept of "clothing. And you will believe you can fly, if sprinkled with her pixie dust.

To round out the cast, Smee is notable as Hook's comic relief, and Dame Redgrave as Wendy's Aunt adds a necessary Victorian touch, the little girl who plays Tiger Lilly is precious, the mermaids are menacing, and Wendy's brothers with the lost boys throw in the delicious little boy gang.

Hook's pirate crew is truly funny and revolting at the same time. Tictoc the croc is really big, and a very real looking digital monster. And who could forget Nana, the Newfoundland nurse dog, who's own brand of protective mischief plays a part in the film.

But it is Wendy, precious and wise Wendy, that really, is what this tale is all about. A young girl on the cusp of womanhood. That is the most tender and fragile of times. She is in love for the first time in her life, with Peter - recalcitrant at parents and teachers authority.

A budding beauty that seeks the freedom that Peter Pan gives. A most complex creature this nubile young lady. She is the focus of the story of Peter Pan. What female actress could fit the bill? Well the makers of the movie looked for someone perfect, interviewed some girls, and in doing so, found the perfect Windy. Rachael Hurd-Wood is an unknown, just pre-teen English lass with lush and long light brown hair, big blue eyes, a body so demure in flannel nightgown, she has dimples and a slightly toothy grin framed by full promising red lips, and such wonderfully perfect cheekbones which mark a little girl as a future beautiful woman.

Prior to Peter Pan, she only acted in school plays. She captured my heart and soul as she did Peter's. And now, because of this part, Rachael is Windy always and forever. She takes on the roll as mother to the lost boys in a touching caretaker way. Yet she is tomboyish and brave enough to sword fight both Pan and Hook. And Wendy is the conscience of civilization. When Peter tempts her "come with me. That's love. That's magic. That is the lure of Never Land. If as a parent, you are reticent to take your child to this wonderful film, it would be as if you would have prevented said offspring from seeing "The Wizard of Oz.

This is a wonderful film. One that adult and child can enjoy together. A true classic and I highly recommend it. Oh, and while you are at it, buy Barrie's book as well, and read it to yourself and to your children, as Peter's shadow watches over you.

Start your free trial. Sign In. Keep track of everything you watch; tell your friends. Full Cast and Crew. Release Dates. Official Sites. Company Credits. Technical Specs. Plot Summary. Plot Keywords. Parents Guide. External Sites. User Reviews. User Ratings. External Reviews. Metacritic Reviews. Photo Gallery. Trailers and Videos. Crazy Credits. Alternate Versions. Rate This. Director: P. Writers: J. Barrie play , P. Added to Watchlist. From metacritic. The Best For Kids. Share this Rating Title: Peter Pan 6.

Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Learn more More Like This. Pan Adventure Comedy Family. Peter Pan 2: Return to Never Land Animation Adventure Family. Peter Pan Nanny McPhee I seek to defend the story of Peter Pan and in particular this version.

It is precisely this evident descent towards Wendy's loss of innocence that both disturbs and excites adult readers of the books and this is quite intentional. Children who are not of an age to appreciate this level are untouched by it but rather take delight in the glorious idea of never having to grow up but instead being allowed to play forever.

Indeed the relationship between Pan and Hook is the struggle of youth to overcome the onset of age singular human vanity and innocent childish rebellion combined. I do not believe that this film's handling of this aspect of the book was merely present in "sick adult humour", I believe that it was beautifully hinted at in a way which would stimulate adult appreciation and childish fascination in the character of Pan. I should like to make mention of the parallel which Mr Ulmer draws between this version of Peter Pan and Jumanji namely the use of the same actors to play the adversary and the father of the lead character is not just a trick put in to hark back to that film.

Indeed the tradition of the same actor playing the role of Mr Darling AND Hook dates back to the story's original appearance as a stage play at the turn of the century and has been carried on on most occasions since then, though I concede that the Disney version a far less worthy and sterilised version failed to keep this tradition up.

As for the point at which the two boys are hung upside down in their nightshirts, I thought it was funny, as did the rest of the audience in the theatre and we certainly weren't there with a red pen counting the number of bottom shots as Mr Ulmer appears to have done. This film is full of charming humour, adult overtones for the adults, childish fantasy and wonderment for those of the appropriate age. The acting is superb in all areas and I must make particular mention of both Ludivine Sagnier as a wickedly funny Tink and of course Rachel Hurd-Wood whose screen debut showed her as a previously undiscovered talent who will surely go far.

All the others were excellent also. All in all this film rekindled my love of the book which I have now re-read a number of times and makes up for all those years Pan has spent in the Disney wilderness.

HermioneSnape 30 December From the moment when I saw the first preview for this movie in the theaters, I was completely captivated. I've always loved the story of Peter Pan; I grew up watching the Disney and Mary Martin versions, and always thought the story to be one of undeniable power and beauty.

When the film was released, I went to see it with my family, and was overwhelmed. I laughed, gasped, and cried, and the movie had my complete and enthralled attention from the opening notes of James Newton Howard's equally magical score through the end credits. Miss Hurd-Wood perfectly captures the spirit of Wendy--maternal, precocious, brave, loving, and loyal--and Mr.

Isaacs is endearing as Mr. Darling and both fearsome and deliciously erotic as Captain Hook. Jeremy Sumpter also did a fabulous job as the title character, Peter Pan, and I thoroughly disagree with those who proclaim his performance as "wooden"; in my opinion, he captured Pan's eternally childlike spirit perfectly, and the chemistry between him and Miss Hurd-Wood was very real and something that was sadly missing from both the Disney-fied version and the stage versions which have cast women in the role of Peter.

The Lost Boys were all brilliant, and worked together and with Mr. Sumpter comfortably to create a believable and familiar little family. The pirates were, of course, delightfully evil, and Richard Briers as Smee served often for comic relief, even as Hook thoughtlessly shot down crew members left and right.

The lovely and gentle Olivia Williams was a wonderful Mrs. Mary Darling, and her exchanges with Mr. Isaacs as Mr. Darling were believably loving. James Newton Howard did a wonderful job with the musical score for this film, completely capturing with both adult and children choirs, lilting woodwinds and strings, synthesizers, menacing and heroic brass, and magical bells, the spirit of Neverland and of Peter--mysterious, enchanting, innocent, with an undercurrent of darkness just beneath the surface that erupts full-force when Captain Hook is on the screen.

I would rate the soundtrack a triumphant 10 out of 10 stars. Everything fit together perfectly, in my mind, to bring forth to the masses a faithful and touching version of the classic story--I left the theater feeling profoundly moved and thoroughly enchanted anew with the story I had known since childhood.

Every time I watch this film or listen to the soundtrack, I am haunted by its magical power for days afterward. I love this film dearly, and offer my thanks and praise to its cast and crew. A perfect RosalieBustingMyBowls 16 June I can't say enough about it! This has quickly become my favorite film of all time.

It's hard for me to explain why, but, NO movie has touched my heart like this before, ever. It's dark, funny, SEXY, intelligent, and a bit scary; just like the original novel. She really does look like she belongs in another era! I can't believe they found this girl at an open casting call!

If she chooses to continue acting, Rachel surely has the power to become one of the biggest actresses in the world within the next few years.

As for Jeremy Sumpter, he was, in my opinion, equally as brilliant. I've been a fan of his since his first film!! Frailty was obviously a different kind of movie, and Jeremy was good in that, but, he just IS Peter Pan!! I'm not ashamed to admit I have a crush on this boy. His smile melts me every time, and he has the indescribable boyish charm that is essential for the role.

I know a lot of people get on his case about his little lisp, and about his supposed "wooden" acting, but, I thought he was the perfect choice.

A lot of people dislike how Tinker Bell was played, but I really enjoyed Ludvines performance!! Tink is everything she's supposed to be: Jealous, petty, and totally devoted to Peter! She is, after all, a very "common girl" and I thought that aspect came across great. There isn't one weak performance in this flick. The Lost Boys are all charming and adorable in their own individual ways.

Jason is also effectively meek and mild as Mr. As Smee, Richard Briars never fails to get laughs. Darling, and she is really one of the most beautiful woman i've ever seen. This movie was far superior than anything i've seen in a looooong time. I just think it's pretty damn near perfect, and it's already a classic in my eyes. We can quibble all we want about the films imperfections, but, I just like to focus on the MANY things that the movie got right.

The special effects are often jaw-dropping without feeling overdone. The colors in this movie are drool-worthy. It's like nothing i've ever seen! This is VASTLY underrated by many people, bur i'm pleased that it got as least mostly positive reviews, and has a devoted fanbase that grows every day!

Rent this, and the whole family will love it!! What other movie has sword fighting, flying, fairies, mermaids, indians, pirates, AND romance!?!?

Long Live Peter Pan!!! We attended the World Premier of "Peter Pan" in London and are happy to report that the film is exquisitely lensed, brilliantly cast and resounding with Barrie's original concepts of growth, loss and the bittersweet beauties of life.

For young and old, this is definitely a must-see film. While watching the film I was caught by the memory of being a child again. All the wonder and sheer joy of it. I felt that sensation, as I did so many years ago upon reaching that moment in my life just on the cusp of adolescence, when I realized there was something much more to life than play and schoolbooks. It was fascinating and frightening. PJ Hogan has done a superb job of melding these adult emotional truths and childish delights.

The script balances the themes with a touch of magic, adherring to Barrie's works quite faithfully verbatim at times , while infusing the whole with wit and wisdom. This is not a dumb film to be viewed as mere spectacle. The dialogue will make you laugh and think and most certainly feel. And this thanks to superb casting. One has to admire the producers and directors for casting for talent and appropriateness for role above Hollywood stardom.

Rachel Hurd-Wood, in her first performance handles Wendy's emotional struggles with the acting chops of a seasoned veteran. She is a youthful beauty on the edge of bloom and one has high hopes of seeing her yet again. Jeremy Sumpter, excellent in last year's "Fraility," is definitely Peter Pan. Cocky, adventuresome and self-absorbed. He handles the demanding action extremely well, and while at times his American accent is a bit troublesome, he does manage to capture Peter's uncertainty regarding his choice to remain forever young and therefore left behind.

And then there's the leading man in character disguise, Jason Isaacs. In a word, brillaint. And beautiful to behold in the demanding and complex dual roles of the dorky Mr. Darling and the dangerous, handsome Captain Hook. So polar in appearance are these portrayals that if you didn't understand Barrie's tradition of casting the same actor for both roles, you might not recognize him. His Darling and Hook are divergent yet deeply connected roles, and Isaacs never gives in to camp or ham acting.

Its a superbly intelligent and mesmerizing performance and he embues the whole with genuine charisma and virile sex appeal. With his leading man looks and leading man talent, one has to wonder why he's not a big star yet. Visually, the film is exquisite to behold. One of the most beautiful films to simply "look at" that this viewer has yet to see.

The entire screen is awash in vibrant storybook colors and elaborately detailed yet enticing sets. All production values are top shelf and belie the enormous budget. As for the special effects, it is difficult to tell where traditional wire work and set stunts end and special effects take over. This film is a hugely complicated effort that does at times call a bit too much attention to itself to the distraction of the story itself.

Less would have been more in some places, particularly in the final battle. James Newton Howard's score is magical and enhances the story without overwhelming.

I've been humming the tune since last week. Patterson's costuming is spot-on and imaginative without detracting from the iconic nature of the characters. This tale is iconic and classic after all and for the first time audiences can truly witness and enjoy Barrie's deep and delightful tale as he intended. See the film, you will rediscover so many things lost and now found again. The kids will love it, too! By Bradley A. Draper One must see this movie with an innocent, to glean the full joy of this precious childhood fantasy in film.

I had that privilege with my seventeen year old Niece, Allison. Ah, to be seventeen again. Such a magical age. But I digress, back to the movie. Every frame in this dream like story is an oil brushed painting.

This film is so visually beautiful it will take your breath away. From dodging cannon balls in pink cotton candy clouds, to sailing ships in the sky, and a live golden sprite called Tinkerbell, such imagery will carry the young at heart to Never Land, forever and a day.

And the score sweeps to match the brush of such sights the eye beholds. The script was actually pretty simple, but is it? The director, P. Hogan, chose to follow J.

Barrie's book, a sweet little English Victorian children's fairy tale with adult overtones, that tells the story of Pan, the boy who never grows up. This memory is in the thought of every responsible adult, in a whimsical wisp of a dream that is nostalgia. So the story is set, the imagery is magic, the music is perfect, but always, that is the easy part.

The writer, director, and most importantly, the cast must pull off the story to make it really sing. This is after all just a movie, and it is dictated that a movie should be generally profitable. I care not one wit for this, as I seek a diversion from reality, and "Peter Pan" the movie took me to childhood's comfort.

This cast really works. There is Peter Pan of course. The Pan, the tempter at the bedroom window. Jeremy Sumpter is Peter Pan. He is a daunting young man, very athletic, and he has that melting smile of the mischievous boy that seems to affect the female heart. Yet, he is still a cocky cut-throat little soldier, ready to take on Hook and his band of pirates.

Jeremy finally breaks the mold, successfully, of middle aged gamine women who had played Pan in the past, and it is refreshing for sure to see Peter the way he should really be. As a young and brash boy, with dirty feet and hands, blond tousled hair, in one hand a sword, and in the other an acorn - a kiss, for Wendy. Jeremy as Peter has some rather heartbreaking moments that affected my male heart, and like all men, I suddenly felt a longing to be a lost boy.

Wendy's father sans Captain Hook, is traditionally one in the same, and this movie rendition is no different. The disciplinarian, and forbidden male dominator, Jason Isaacs perfectly portrays Wendy's Father and Captain Hook, in a delicious dichotomy of stodgy Victorian Dad and the vile evil villain of a pirate.

Hook is not to be ignored for he is a key character in this tale. Hook is bad, but we can admire him. And for one moment, Wendy wants to be a pirate and join Hook and his motley crew, as "Red Handed Jill" - ah - a great pirate name, as Hook would remark with gusto. Olivia Williams is cast as Wendy's Mother. Olivia is one of the most beautiful women alive today.

This is necessary, as she must impart a genetic note upon her daughter. Wendy is as beautiful too - just not quite grown up yet. Olivia as Mother of her kidnapped children, is heartbreaking, as night after night, she sleeps in their room, and insists the window be kept open for their return. And when they do, such joy, and Olivia's maternal instincts convince a stodgy husband to adopt the lost boys.

Then there is the fairy sprite "Tinkerbell". She is a key player. Tink is the temptress, the reason Peter Pan stays young. Yet she holds faith in her magical wings and cements the story's chapters together. Tinkerbell is portrayed by the current French coquette that wishes to be Bridgett Bardot, Ludvine Sagnier, who has been seen in French films, in various states of undress.

Oh, how perfect, because Tink is a nymph, a sprite, a fairy, and has no concept of "clothing. And you will believe you can fly, if sprinkled with her pixie dust. To round out the cast, Smee is notable as Hook's comic relief, and Dame Redgrave as Wendy's Aunt adds a necessary Victorian touch, the little girl who plays Tiger Lilly is precious, the mermaids are menacing, and Wendy's brothers with the lost boys throw in the delicious little boy gang.

Hook's pirate crew is truly funny and revolting at the same time. Tictoc the croc is really big, and a very real looking digital monster. And who could forget Nana, the Newfoundland nurse dog, who's own brand of protective mischief plays a part in the film.

But it is Wendy, precious and wise Wendy, that really, is what this tale is all about. A young girl on the cusp of womanhood. That is the most tender and fragile of times. She is in love for the first time in her life, with Peter - recalcitrant at parents and teachers authority.

A budding beauty that seeks the freedom that Peter Pan gives. A most complex creature this nubile young lady. She is the focus of the story of Peter Pan.

What female actress could fit the bill? Well the makers of the movie looked for someone perfect, interviewed some girls, and in doing so, found the perfect Windy. Rachael Hurd-Wood is an unknown, just pre-teen English lass with lush and long light brown hair, big blue eyes, a body so demure in flannel nightgown, she has dimples and a slightly toothy grin framed by full promising red lips, and such wonderfully perfect cheekbones which mark a little girl as a future beautiful woman.

Prior to Peter Pan, she only acted in school plays. She captured my heart and soul as she did Peter's. And now, because of this part, Rachael is Windy always and forever. She takes on the roll as mother to the lost boys in a touching caretaker way. Yet she is tomboyish and brave enough to sword fight both Pan and Hook.

And Wendy is the conscience of civilization. When Peter tempts her "come with me. That's love. That's magic. That is the lure of Never Land.

If as a parent, you are reticent to take your child to this wonderful film, it would be as if you would have prevented said offspring from seeing "The Wizard of Oz. This is a wonderful film. One that adult and child can enjoy together.

A true classic and I highly recommend it. Oh, and while you are at it, buy Barrie's book as well, and read it to yourself and to your children, as Peter's shadow watches over you. On one level it's just a children's story, beautifully told. But it's more than that - much more. It's about family, sacrifice, responsibility; the joys of childhood and the inevitability of leaving it behind; generational conflict, aging and loneliness; and the wonder, confusion, exhilaration and excitement of first love.

It's a complex tale with elements of Greek mythology and Freudian psychology, but also a simple story of good versus evil. At the ripe old age of 12 or so, Wendy Darling, who lives in Victorian London, is informed that it's time she became a young lady.

She is displeased, and ends up flying off to Neverland with Peter Pan and her brothers, just like in the stories she tells them each evening no electronic entertainment back then. In Neverland there are Indians and pirates and mermaids and the Lost Boys.

There are fairies and castles and forests and the evil Captain James Hook. There is danger and adventure and yes, even romance. Of course, this is all really just Wendy's dream, isn't it?

The movie is beautiful to look at, and the orchestral score is just right. And then there's the cast Olivia Williams is a beautiful and touching Mrs. Richard Briers as Hook's right-hand man Smee oops Wendy's brothers, Tiger Lily, and the Lost Boys as a group are both hilarious and endearing. Ludivine Sagnier as Tink was appropriately jealous and naughty. Have I forgotten anybody? Jason Isaacs is great as the unassertive Mr.

Darling, and just out-of-this-world as the evil, dashing, depraved, pathetic and manipulative Captain James Hook. This IS a children's movie, and Isaacs walks a fine line perfectly. And he can play the harpsichord with a hand and a hook! It's truly a beautiful thing to watch them interact, and it's tough not to love them both before it's over. Together they embark on a little dance of internal discovery that is funny, cute, heartbreaking and ultimately life-affirming.

There are lots of terrific special effects, but the goal isn't Lord-of-the-Rings-type realism. The fairytale has jumped off the pages of a lushly illustrated book, and we are there.

With a sprinkling of fairy dust together with happy thoughts, we can fly and LIKE it! Finally, some parting thoughts. Except for Jeremy Sumpter as Peter, the cast is British and Australian, and they very much sound like it, so Americans may have to listen extra closely I might just be getting old. Having a look at the book "Peter and Wendy" by J. Barrie Peter Pan's creator can refresh your memory if you don't know or have forgotten the story like me.

To really enjoy the movie, it's best to let down your defenses and become a kid again for a bit. In fact, if that idea is unappealing, you might want to pass on this film.

However, if you like it the first time you see it, you may well LOVE it the second time Rating: 9 out of Okay, so unless you've been living in some bizarre netherworld with no access to any media for the last century and then some, you've heard the story of Peter Pan, the boy who would not grow up. Personally, I haven't read Barrie's book, or play either.

But you bet I'm looking for it now. I've seen the pantomimes, I own the Disney version, but both have been far overshadowed by this masterpiece of a film. Whoever started the tradition of an adult female in Peter's role wants shooting, or killing painfully in some way at least. After seeing Jeremy Sumpter's performance as Peter, seeing that cheeky and heart melting grin, watching how accurately the emotions that his character is going through shine through in the way he looks and moves, if I happened to meet the critics that were so hard on him, I'd be giving them an earful about it.

I am an actress, and to do what he did, put up with the sword fights, the flying and learning that wonderful script, is a damn hard job. Plus, he was only 14 at the time I think. I couldn't do all that at once if you payed me a million pounds. Rachel Hurdwood does a smashing job of playing Wendy Darling sooo much envy And who could forget Jason Isaacs as Hook? Smee got some awesome lines 'Its all a bit tragic really, isn't it?

I like it how the weather in Neverland ties in with Peter's emotions, and that the director was not afraid to show the darker side of the story. The film will thrill children, no matter what the critics say. My little sister is 7, and she enjoyed it as much as I did. It makes you think very deeply about the characters and particularly the troubles Peter is presented with, if you're older.

After all, what Peter Pan has is what every ten year old boy wants.. Hook could not have been more wrong exposing Peter as not the golden boy he wants everyone to see him as, but the sad, lonely boy trapped in his own fairy tale that he really is.

Wendy and her brothers even the Lost Boys -slightly was cool- might be able to return home, but for him the window is shut, and will always be, since in Neverland the only way to die is to be killed perforce. The 'I do believe in fairies' scene was funny, but a bit annoying.. As for the chemistry between Rachel and Jeremy which, had it not been palpably real, would have ruined the movie , it reminded me of Romeo and Juliet.

You know how it ends, but you so hope that one of them will make the ultimate sacrifice, or that something will change so they can be together.

But, Pan being Pan, his love of being forever youthful is too great for him to go back on it, even for his Wendy. He would rather she to nab from the movie go home, and take her feelings with her than force him to grow up. In a way though, she did. She made him question staying in Neverland for the first time, and when he was looking in at the window at the end of the film, you could see on his face that he was torn in two, at least for a few minutes, before dear old Tink pulled him away.

This movie would have been a box office smash, had it not been released between Potter and Lotr. Too much competition. But this film has set a new standard for Pan movies, and a damn high one. I will be very surprised if anyone manages to top it in my lifetime, or indeed my children's.

If I have any Commendations to all, and to the critics that found anything major wrong about this film, watch it again with an open mind. Your opinion will change. It will. The music is enchanting, the scenes picturesque to the minutest detail, and the entire cast on top form. And remember, All Children Grow Up Except One. Frankly, I was never much of a fan of the Peter Pan story. The idea of a leaf-covered flying child plucking children away from their nursery seems a little far-fetched to say the least.

But this Dreamworks production will blow you away. The movie's immense charm lies in its unpretentious and faithful manner of retelling an old but familiar reverie. Peter Pan gently takes you on a flight of fantasy, reliving those precious memories you thought were long buried beneath the sands of Time.

Its depiction of the stronghold of nursery rhymes and bedtime stories is almost magical. As the story goes, Wendy Darling is soon turning 13 and fears the transition from childhood to adulthood. Along comes Peter Pan who whisks her and her brothers to Neverland where children never grow up and the only evil to fight is a bunch of dim-witted pirates adults, of course.

There, they have their adventure, defeat the pirates and return home. Sounds like a like a simple trip to Nirvana and back, right? Perhaps; the idea of flying off into the night without a care in the world is no doubt an alluring one. It's the stuff childhood dreams are made of. Incredible charms aside, Peter Pan does so much more than merely skim the surface of blissful waters; it plunges the depths and explores themes that will hit you like a brick --of reality-- in the face.

It's a story of our fears, courage, imagination, understanding and acceptance. Wendy was daunted by the prospect of growing into the adult world where unknown evils seemed to lurk in every corner. It was, after all, unfamiliar territory compared to the comfortable nursery where she had spent all her life thus far. So flying off to Neverland and staying there for good seemed a great idea. But as Wendy slowly discovered, there is no absolute bliss, no Nirvana-- even if you had your greatest fears removed.

A world without parents to guide and care for them is decidedly wrong, just as a world without dreams and fantasies would be starkly void of wonders.

To live like the timeless Peter Pan would be to escape the bonds of reality while tying yourself down by another set of chains-- that of our own imagination and cowardice.

Oh, I'm not saying that Peter Pan is a coward. But Captain Hook couldn't have been more right in his life when he called him "a tragedy".

Peter Pan, for all his legendary adventures and triumphs over sniveling pirates, could not conquer his one fear of the real world. And that inability to accept "growing up" as part of his life is what made him "incomplete", to paraphrase Wendy. His self-denial and insecurity was ever so lucid when he said, "I taught you to fly, to fight with swords What more can there be?

Apparently, his Utopia is one where we will never have to be burdened with heavy issues, like "feelings". But Wendy's reply must've sunk it in for him: "I don't know Otherwise, some things will forever be a mystery to us. And truly, for all his joys in Neverland, Peter Pan was to be forever barred from having the love and care of a family because he chose to live in an adult-less "reality". Upon retrospect, is that price any smaller than that which we have to pay for growing up? Really, in this world there is no complete answer to our problems; there is no perfect circle of happiness that can be drawn.

What we do have is our imagination to help us get the most out of whatever we have, and pray that our courage and vivacity would be enough to fend off those unknown monsters of the night. The story of Peter Pan teaches us to understand the inevitability of the passage of Time, to accept the necessity of change, and finally, to embrace all that the world has to offer.

All is not lost even as our childhood days pass into the faded pages of the calendar. Our dreams do not simply die when we take on the role of an adult; they are ours to keep and savor. Stepping into adulthood does not mean abandoning that child in you. In fact, you should cherish it all the more because it is you past; that which molded what you have become today. There is a fine line between being caught up in the moment of fantasy and learning to keep that fantasy as a part of you even as you're forced to step out of it.

The Eternal Child was unable to conquer his worst enemy-- his own fears-- and was so condemned to never truly "live", sealing his fate as an evergreen legend of our fantasies.

This is truly a film made from the heart-- stunning visuals, directing, music and acting. And for those who are looking for something more than just a few hours of entertainment, this movie gives you something to think hard over. The brilliance lasts long after you exit the cinema. I loved this movie.

It is one of the best movies I've ever seen. Jason Isaacs is one of my favorite actors, and this movie just proved why. He was able to play a kind and lovable Mr. Darling, then turn around and play the fearsome James Hook. There were several moments in this film that just hit home.

It gave me shivers when everyone was chanting "I do believe in fairies. It just lifts you into the air with joy and I couldn't help grinning. Another beautiful scene is the fairy dance. It is so pure and sweet. I must touch again on the brilliance of Jason Isaacs. Never before have I seen a character who is so evil, yet, in some scenes, likable.

The portrayal of the character was amazing. I recommend that everyone see this movie. It will be enjoyed by adults, children, boys and girls. Girls will especially enjoy seeing young Wendy sword fighting instead of letting Peter have all the fun.

This is an amazing movie that everyone should see. TotallyRad89 14 November I thought that this film showed a more real sense than that of the cartoon. Even though people can't really fly, it's nice to get away from reality now and again. I didn't know if I was going to like it, but after watching it I was more than liking it, I loved it. Jeremy Sumpter did an amazing job as Peter.

I was surprised to learn that he's only By far the best film I've seen in a while. It's a great family film as well as a film just about anyone could like. If you haven't seen it, put it on the to watch list. This film is a state of art masterpiece that showed a side on adventure and heroism that not only of Peter Pan, but of Wendy. I can't believe what an amazing job these actors did in this movie. For once, this version wasn't cheesy. Rachel Hurd-Wood playing Wendy was great for a newcomer in the entertainment business.

PJ Hogan at his best! This is a fantastic movie to sit down and watch with your family! The imagination and creativity that PJ brought into this movie was just terrific. The special effects were great.

It truly felt like you were in Neverland, along with London. This movie has a little bit of everything such as comedy and a lot of romance,action,adventure,pirates,friendship,and drama. Everything you want in a fantasy movie and thats what the actors gave you.

Best movie of I say! This latest edition of Peter Pan is a true delight. Jeremy Sumpter is the quintessential Peter Pan. His facial features, his body language, his vocal inflections, all were spot-on in my humble opinion. Oh, and my daughters think he's cute! But it is his bravado, tempered with his boyish charm, that gives the role a new "feel" that was always lacking in past renditions of the tale of Peter Pan.

He looks as though he is having a great time playing the part, and his delight at being the boy who never has to grow up leaps off the screen and envelopes the audience. Jason Isaacs is also very good as Captain Hook, menacing but slightly charming in a strange sort of way.

Rachel Hurd-Wood is fine too, as Wendy.