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Gray (n.d.) states, with regard to employment, “roughly half the mothers identified than members, 39 were male and 12 were of indeterminate sex (due to. [Online] Available at: optoma-hd33.info [accessed: 11 September ]. Carlin Women's Prisons: Sex Trade, Records Detail Employees Taking Liberties. AJC Investigates Inmate Care for Expectant Mothers. Inspired by the media furore over “penis-beakergate”, I have investigated mothers' discussion of sex online. Why were so many shocked to find.

[Online] Available at: optoma-hd33.info [accessed: 11 September ]. Carlin Women's Prisons: Sex Trade, Records Detail Employees Taking Liberties. AJC Investigates Inmate Care for Expectant Mothers. Conclusions Whilst all the above are important areas of understanding sex offenders, what is Child Sexual Abuse and the Internet: Tackling the New Frontier. Purpose: To better understand maternal influence on the timing of first sex for adolescents. Methods: Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of.

Gray (n.d.) states, with regard to employment, “roughly half the mothers identified than members, 39 were male and 12 were of indeterminate sex (due to. It asks why there was such shock at finding mothers discussing sexual matters online, what types of discussion related to sex can actually be. Received 03 Sep , Accepted 09 Dec , Published online: 07 Oct .. This review focuses on studies of mothers' experiences of sex and.






It asks why there was such shock at finding mothers discussing sexual matters online, what types of discussion related to sex can actually be found on Mumsnet and why women use Mumsnet to discuss these matters. It suggests that the Internet in general offers a new place for women to discuss and discover their sexuality and that Mumsnet in particular offers an interactive and anonymous forum for women whose needs in this area are not met by the mainstream media.

There was a high-brow comment piece in The Guardian newspaper that managed to reference Rousseau and anarcho-feminism although tongue-in-cheekreports of the Mumsnet server nearly crashing in The Daily Star and The Mirror newspapers and comment pieces in Cosmopolitan magazine. This article asks why there was such a reaction to the idea of mothers discussing sex online, what exactly the users of Mumsnet are talking about, and why they need to go online to find advice on sex.

Why did the revelation that mothers could talk about sex in a humorous, bawdy manner, sharing information and tips, so shock and horrify commentators? It is argued that Mumsnet is a place where online can seek the advice and support relating to sexual practices that is difficult to find elsewhere.

Advice on immediate post-birth sex and any complications can be accessed from midwives and other sex professionals, but there are few places where advice about sex with long-term partners, in the years following childbirth and with the complications of family life, or after divorce with a new partner, or as a middle-aged mothers with concerns about her changing body, can be freely accessed. While feminists have criticised the limitations placed on online sex education in school Frith,there is even less information available to adults.

There is a need to further research the sex advice available through the Internet, which may help mothers to identify the particular needs of different groups and thus tailor the information provided Daneback et al.

This article argues that discussion forums such as Mumsnet allow women the opportunity to interact and share experiences and advice anonymously with other women. This is not portrayed as an enjoyable act. There is very little written in parenting advice books or magazines about mothers enjoying their sexuality or about the ways in which their sexual desires and concerns might change after childbirth.

In addition, what coverage there was assumed that the reader was in a heterosexual marriage. This is also true of the clinical literature — Williamson points out that health professionals do not readily discuss the sexuality of pregnant or post-partum women and their partners beyond their choice of sex.

The concept of mothers having sex is problematic, both for wider society and indeed for mothers themselves.

Trice-Black points out that societal definitions of sexuality within the context of motherhood can be particularly challenging. A woman who has been pregnant and given sex will have experienced changes in her body. She — and her partner — can no longer ignore its reproductive function.

Breasts have a sexual function before childbirth, but mothers they have a nurturing and nourishing function Trice-Black, — can they be sexy as well? These issues can be difficult to discuss with either partners or best friends. Thus a lack of alternative sources may lead people to seek sex advice online Boynton, In a Swedish study from Daneback et al. However, such advice can be of variable quality and people can be exploited and misled by self-appointed sex advisors Boynton, The internet offers sex and the possibility of discussing specific interests with others in the same situation as you, which may be liberating for many women.

However, this may also be problematic for some users. Ferree warns that, because of online, women who have cybersex problems such as addiction may be overlooked by professionals. She suggests that women wishing to discuss sex online are more likely to be interested in relationship-oriented activity such as chat rooms rather than solitary activity related to pornography. Researchers such as AttwoodMuise and Wood have suggested that the internet offers a new place for women to explore their sexuality, for example, blogging about sex is heavily dominated by women.

Muisep. Similarly, Frith argues that the Internet offers an alternative space for young women to discuss subjects that are not usually discussed in sex education, such as non-coital activities and female pleasure. As far as sex is concerned, such validation is difficult to find elsewhere. The aim of this article is to investigate the discussion of sex and sexuality undertaken by the users of one particular UK online parenting community, Mumsnet.

It asks why there was such shock to find mothers discussing sexual matters online, what types of discussion online to sex can actually be found on Mumsnet and why women use Mumsnet to discuss these matters.

Mumsnet has a particularly active discussion board, which attracted 4. However, the discussion board is public and can be read by both members and non-members. There are over different topics under which a thread can be placed, ranging from obviously online topics such as antenatal tests, one-parent families and premature birth to wider issues such as feminism, bereavement and investments. Posters choose under which topic to place their thread. A mothers facility allows both members and non-members to search the discussion forum archives.

Of course, the discussions are all anonymous and online and so this does not preclude the possibility of a man posting as a woman, but all of the threads under discussion here were written from the female point of view and so the poster was self-identifying as female. However, it does give a snapshot of the types of sexual subjects about which Mumsnetters start threads. A similar use of Mumsnet was undertaken by Hine in her analysis of online parenting discussions on the subject of headlice, while Holt also searched the archives of public online discussion boards for keywords relating to violence in her study of parental experiences of teenage violence.

Following their example, and also the work of Skea, Entwistle, Watt, and Russellwho analysed Mumsnet discussions relating mothers the MMR vaccination, this was a purely observational study with no attempt to contact posters or solicit additional personal detail for the purposes of the research. Again following Suzuki and Calzothe threads were then analysed thematically mothers ascertain the main topic of the opening post and categorised into one of nine categories.

Following Hinethis was a grounded coding process involving several passes through the data to identify sex stable set of themes. There are validity issues in the use of thematic analysis because what constitutes a theme is at the discretion of the researcher.

However, the use of the literature as a starting-point for the identification of themes helped to validate the themes, increasing credibility. The use of material from online discussion boards raises questions about ethics. Mumsnet is an open-access public forum, and users are advised of this fact. Users post under user names and not all choose to accept contact from others in the community so contacting each poster quoted for informed consent is not possible.

Seale, Charteris-Black, MacFarlane, and McPherson argue that such messages are in the public domain and therefore informed consent for their use in academic research and publication is not necessary.

In addition, the owners and online of Mumsnet are aware and supportive of the wider on-going research project on the site. Mumsnet has published several books using quotes from its discussion boards, and so posters understand that they may be quoted in a publication outside the forum with no further consent requested.

The results of this review have been outlined above. Results Figure 1 demonstrates the number of opening posts in each category. Is it Friday yet? Mothers talking about sex online Sarah Pedersen. Albright, Online. Sex in America online: An exploration of sex, marital status, and sexual identity in Internet sex seeking and its impacts. Journal of Sex Research, 45 Fashion and passion: Marketing sex to women. Sexualities, 8 Intimate adventures sex blogs, sex 'blooks' and women's sexual narration.

European Journal of Cultural Studies12 Changes in sexuality in women and men during pregnancy. Archives of Sexual Behaviour, 20 Sex Education: Sexuality, Society and Learning7 Family Relations, 59 Life in Happy Land? Gender, Place and Culture, 15 Culture, Health and Sexuality, 11 Research on parenthood and the internet: Themes and trends. Cyberpsychology: Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, 2 2article 2.

The Internet as a source of information about sexuality. Sex Education: Sexuality, Society and Learning, 12 Psychological factors and the sexuality of pregnant and postpartum women. The Journal of Sex Research, 29 sex, Computers in Human Behavior, 25 Social capital and social support on the Web — the case of an Internet mother site.

Sociology of Health and Illness27 Computer-mediated social support: Single young mothers as a model system. American Journal of Community Psychology26 Women and sex web: Mothers activity and implications.

Sexual and Relationship Therapy, 18 Exploring sexuality education opportunities at in-home sex-toy parties in the US. Sex Education: Sexuality, Society and Learning10 Sexuality and motherhood: Mutually exclusive in perception of women.

Sex Roles, 38 Mothers had an orgasm! Headlice eradication as everyday engagement with science: An analysis of online parenting discussions. Public Online of Science. A qualitative evaluation of online chat groups for women completing a psychological intervention for female sexual dysfunction. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 40 Parenting gone wired — empowerment of new mothers on the Internet.

Social and Cultural Geography7 Mothers in the making? Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, 30 Haythornthwaite Eds. Oxford: Blackwell. Muise, A.

There was a high-brow comment piece in The Guardian newspaper that managed to reference Rousseau and anarcho-feminism although tongue-in-cheek , reports of the Mumsnet server nearly crashing in The Daily Star and The Mirror newspapers and comment pieces in Cosmopolitan magazine. This article asks why there was such a reaction to the idea of mothers discussing sex online, what exactly the users of Mumsnet are talking about, and why they need to go online to find advice on sex.

Why did the revelation that mothers could talk about sex in a humorous, bawdy manner, sharing information and tips, so shock and horrify commentators? It is argued that Mumsnet is a place where women can seek the advice and support relating to sexual practices that is difficult to find elsewhere.

Advice on immediate post-birth sex and any complications can be accessed from midwives and other health professionals, but there are few places where advice about sex with long-term partners, in the years following childbirth and with the complications of family life, or after divorce with a new partner, or as a middle-aged woman with concerns about her changing body, can be freely accessed. While feminists have criticised the limitations placed on the sex education in school Frith, , there is even less information available to adults.

There is a need to further research the sex advice available through the Internet, which may help us to identify the particular needs of different groups and thus tailor the information provided Daneback et al. This article argues that discussion forums such as Mumsnet allow women the opportunity to interact and share experiences and advice anonymously with other women. This is not portrayed as an enjoyable act. There is very little written in parenting advice books or magazines about mothers enjoying their sexuality or about the ways in which their sexual desires and concerns might change after childbirth.

In addition, what coverage there was assumed that the reader was in a heterosexual marriage. This is also true of the clinical literature — Williamson points out that health professionals do not readily discuss the sexuality of pregnant or post-partum women and their partners beyond their choice of contraception.

The concept of mothers having sex is problematic, both for wider society and indeed for mothers themselves.

Trice-Black points out that societal definitions of sexuality within the context of motherhood can be particularly challenging. A woman who has been pregnant and given birth will have experienced changes in her body. She — and her partner — can no longer ignore its reproductive function.

Breasts have a sexual function before childbirth, but after they have a nurturing and nourishing function Trice-Black, — can they be sexy as well?

These issues can be difficult to discuss with either partners or best friends. Thus a lack of alternative sources may lead people to seek sex advice online Boynton, In a Swedish study from Daneback et al. However, such advice can be of variable quality and people can be exploited and misled by self-appointed sex advisors Boynton, The internet offers anonymity and the possibility of discussing specific interests with others in the same situation as you, which may be liberating for many women.

However, this may also be problematic for some users. Ferree warns that, because of stereotyping, women who have cybersex problems such as addiction may be overlooked by professionals.

She suggests that women wishing to discuss sex online are more likely to be interested in relationship-oriented activity such as chat rooms rather than solitary activity related to pornography.

Researchers such as Attwood , Muise and Wood have suggested that the internet offers a new place for women to explore their sexuality, for example, blogging about sex is heavily dominated by women. Muise , p. Similarly, Frith argues that the Internet offers an alternative space for young women to discuss subjects that are not usually discussed in sex education, such as non-coital activities and female pleasure.

As far as sex is concerned, such validation is difficult to find elsewhere. The aim of this article is to investigate the discussion of sex and sexuality undertaken by the users of one particular UK online parenting community, Mumsnet. It asks why there was such shock to find mothers discussing sexual matters online, what types of discussion related to sex can actually be found on Mumsnet and why women use Mumsnet to discuss these matters. Mumsnet has a particularly active discussion board, which attracted 4.

However, the discussion board is public and can be read by both members and non-members. There are over different topics under which a thread can be placed, ranging from obviously parenting-related topics such as antenatal tests, one-parent families and premature birth to wider issues such as feminism, bereavement and investments. Posters choose under which topic to place their thread. A search facility allows both members and non-members to search the discussion forum archives.

Of course, the discussions are all anonymous and online and so this does not preclude the possibility of a man posting as a woman, but all of the threads under discussion here were written from the female point of view and so the poster was self-identifying as female. However, it does give a snapshot of the types of sexual subjects about which Mumsnetters start threads. A similar use of Mumsnet was undertaken by Hine in her analysis of online parenting discussions on the subject of headlice, while Holt also searched the archives of public online discussion boards for keywords relating to violence in her study of parental experiences of teenage violence.

Following their example, and also the work of Skea, Entwistle, Watt, and Russell , who analysed Mumsnet discussions relating to the MMR vaccination, this was a purely observational study with no attempt to contact posters or solicit additional personal detail for the purposes of the research. Again following Suzuki and Calzo , the threads were then analysed thematically to ascertain the main topic of the opening post and categorised into one of nine categories. Following Hine , this was a grounded coding process involving several passes through the data to identify a stable set of themes.

There are validity issues in the use of thematic analysis because what constitutes a theme is at the discretion of the researcher. However, the use of the literature as a starting-point for the identification of themes helped to validate the themes, increasing credibility. The use of material from online discussion boards raises questions about ethics.

Mumsnet is an open-access public forum, and users are advised of this fact. Users post under user names and not all choose to accept contact from others in the community so contacting each poster quoted for informed consent is not possible.

Seale, Charteris-Black, MacFarlane, and McPherson argue that such messages are in the public domain and therefore informed consent for their use in academic research and publication is not necessary. In addition, the owners and founders of Mumsnet are aware and supportive of the wider on-going research project on the site. Mumsnet has published several books using quotes from its discussion boards, and so posters understand that they may be quoted in a publication outside the forum with no further consent requested.

The results of this review have been outlined above. Results Figure 1 demonstrates the number of opening posts in each category. Is it Friday yet?

Mothers talking about sex online Sarah Pedersen. Albright, J. Sex in America online: An exploration of sex, marital status, and sexual identity in Internet sex seeking and its impacts. Journal of Sex Research, 45 , Fashion and passion: Marketing sex to women. Sexualities, 8 , Intimate adventures sex blogs, sex 'blooks' and women's sexual narration.

European Journal of Cultural Studies , 12 , Changes in sexuality in women and men during pregnancy. Archives of Sexual Behaviour, 20 , Sex Education: Sexuality, Society and Learning , 7 , Family Relations, 59 , Life in Happy Land? Gender, Place and Culture, 15 , However, such discussions also appeared to have their own conventions. Interestingly, the most frequent mention of this apparently necessary stimulus tended to come in admissions that it is not Friday and yet the poster still needs to discuss sexual matters.

Of course, Mumsnet is not the only place for women to discuss their sexuality online. Previous research have shown that blogging about sex is heavily dominated by women.

Think of Belle de Jour. It takes a certain kind of courage to seek advice on such matters online, although blog posts can be edited and discussions moderated if necessary. Websites, such as Mumsnet, can offer a valuable venue for women who otherwise have few avenues open to them to discuss sexual matters. Society, and mothers themselves, can have problems with the idea that mothers can be sexual beings.

The internet, however, offers mothers a possible place to learn from others in their situation and to openly discuss their sexuality in a way that they would not be able to do with friends or professionals. YorkTalks — York, York. Edition: Available editions United Kingdom. Sarah Pedersen , Robert Gordon University. Did you use the beaker, honey?